Seaside Stories

Lookout on Neahkahnie Mountain

June 9, 2013 | by Veronica Russell

Sometimes an Oregon Coast outdoor adventure doesn’t require sunshine.

Working at the Seaside Visitors Bureau, we often get asked what there is to do on a rainy day at the Coast. The question seems simple enough to answer, right? I mean, we could certainly rattle off a dozen or more indoor things to do.  But before we go there, we like to think “outside the box” a little. The Oregon Coast has so much stunning natural beauty it would be a shame to let a little rain make you miss out on seeing some of the magical places on this part of the Coast.

One important thing to notice about Oregon Coast weather: not all rainy days are created equal. Sure, we have our share of downpours. But, we also have days that start out with only a touch of rain, and then the sun peeks through, mixing magic into the clouds, painting a little drama in the sky. When we’re lucky, this happens just in time for sunset.

But, rain or shine, there are plenty of outdoor adventures to be had on the North Coast. One of our favorite must-sees is the spectacular panorama from Neahkahnie Mountain, about 25 minutes south of Seaside. This edge-of-the-world view is one that can be appreciated from either the hiking trails over the mountain or from vista points just off Highway 101. This part of the Pacific Coast Scenic Byway winds around the cliff sides at Oswald West State Park, offering several vehicle turnouts from which to watch the waves crash against Tillamook Bay and the shores of Manzanita nearly 1600 feet below.

Neahkahnie Mountain is the perfect site for spotting whales, especially during migration seasons. During fishing seasons, the waters sparkle at night with lights from working boats anchored in the bay. At the turnouts along the highway, you’ll notice a rock wall that was built by stone masons in the 1930s. This seemingly decorative structure actually supports the highway and creates a striking element for your photos, taken rain or shine, on this beautiful Oregon edge of the world.

Editors Note: Whale Watching takes place almost all year round on the Oregon Coast. However, peak migrations take place during late December to early January and during late march lasting through June. Want to view the bobbing boat lights on the horizon? Crab season along the Oregon coast typically begins December 1 and continues through August 14. The peak harvest occurs during the first eight weeks of the season.

Leave a Reply

and so much more!

Still Room for Improvement in Customer Service

Excellence in customer service awards results for 2015

Learn More
Oregon Coast Visitor Tsunami Awareness Program

Tsunami awareness resources from the Office of Emergency Management

Learn More
The Big Storm

The Oregon Climate Service calls it the Great Coastal Gale of 2007, but here in Seaside we just call it The Big Storm.

Learn More
Celebrating Spring

Celebrating spring and the lush wildlife in Seaside and the North Oregon Coast.

Learn More
Seaside Watercraft Adventures
Seaside Watercraft Adventures

Seaside watercraft adventures await visitors of all skill levels. With two rivers and multiple access points, anyone can enjoy the...

Learn More
The Whole Clam Family

Family clamming on Seaside's beach is a tradition that literaly goes back thousands of years.

Learn More
Portland to Seaside by Bus

Visiting Seaside without a Car

Learn More
Measuring Seaside’s Success

The barometer for marketing and advertising success of a destination can be tough to measure. There are several metrics we have ac...

Learn More
Watching Nature Run its Course in Seaside

Wonderful natural beauty in Seaside,

Learn More
Views of Tillamook Rock Lighthouse are well within your reach thanks to the adventure of the Tillamook Head Trail just south of Seaside.
How to Get Epic Tillamook Rock Lighthouse Views

Your quest to see Tillamook Rock begins on the south side of Seaside at the end of Sunset Boulevard.

Learn More
1859 – Oregon’s Magazine: 72 Hours In Seaside

1859 came to Seaside/Gearhart area and spent 72 hours in our fair neck of the woods. Day One they highlighted the historic Gilbert...

Learn More
SOLV Beach Clean Up

When I look at our beaches I don’t see garbage. I see a breathtaking coastline, and I think how lucky we are to have such pristine beauty right in our own backyard. I believe most beachgoers, both locals and tourists, are conscientious about disposing their refuse properly after a day playing on the beach. So why do we have the SOLV beach cleanup twice a year?

Learn More
Surrey in Seaside
How to Bike Seaside

Our author takes a look at the various ways to bike in and around Seaside, Oregon.

Learn More
Gayway Park in the early 1960s

GAyway Park in the 1960s was a major family attraction in Seaside, Oregon

Learn More
New Seaside App a perfect tool for visitors and locals

An overview of Seaside's new mobile application

Learn More
Seaside Skatepark

The Seaside Skatepark (also called the PTR “Hometown Park”) has a unique history. It was opened in June of 2007, and was built by Placed to Ride. The owner of Placed to Ride, Stefan Hauser, lives here in Seaside.

Learn More
Trying to take flight during a wind storm on the beach in Seaside, Oregon.
Tides and Tide Tables: What You Need to Know

If your winter beach vacations to date have required sunscreen, then you clearly have not experienced a magical Seaside day in Jan...

Learn More
Keeping Watch on Our Waters

Washington lighthouses, just an hour's drive from Seaside, are historic wonders

Learn More