Seaside History

Everything but War

October 23, 2013 | by Nate Burke

During World War II, several signs were raised around Seaside that illustrated the global conflict raging around the world.  The sign pictured here stood at the Turnaround (right in front of the Shore Coffee Shop sign by The Hotel Seaside) and pointedly states that “Seaside has EVERYTHING but war. . .”  The mileage to the major theaters of war speaks volumes about Seaside’s relative distance from the major conflicts rocking the world at the time.

Despite the 4,777 miles between Tokyo and Seaside, the distance was suddenly minimized when Fort Stevens was shelled by a Japanese submarine in 1942.  Since the beach front of Fort Stevens is only around 12 miles north, the residents of Seaside could hear the explosions and feel the ground rumble with the concussion from the bombs.

During this period of global turmoil, signs were posted all around town that required all vehicles to dim their headlights at night.  Complete blackouts were common and many Seaside residents remember the pensive dark nights.  Streetlights were covered at night to discourage air attacks; curtains in homes were sealed tight and taped around the perimeter to keep light from leaking out.  It was true that Seaside had “everything but war”, but nobody knew for how long.

and so much more!

Driving the Oregon Coast Highway

Unique views are plentiful along all 363 miles

Learn More
Saddle Mountain State Park Excursion

A day trip to Saddle Mountain adds diversity to Seaside as a destination vacation.

Learn More
How to Start Cycling In Seaside

Few places in the Pacific Northwest are as primed for pedal-powered exploration as Seaside. I should know since I’ve ridden abou...

Learn More
The Columbia River Maritime Museum: On the Water’s Edge

A visit to the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria.

Learn More
Seaside Nightlife

Above photo: A group enjoys some live music in a photo by Don Frank. Some visitors come to Seaside for the beach, some for the att...

Learn More
Establishing Another World Record

Seaside Beach Volleyball Tournament establishes yet another record during stellar event.

Learn More
Seaside Lifeguards: A Fond Seasonal Farewell

Can you believe it’s almost Labor Day Weekend? Don’t fret!  We’re still probably in for some dynamic weather throughout Sep...

Learn More
A Kid-Free Couple’s Getaway

We know kids love Seaside. And Seaside loves kids. But you can, of course, enjoy Seaside without the youngsters in tow. Whether yo...

Learn More
The Tale of the Driftwood Forts

As driftwood forts become more rare along the Oregon Coast, the memories hold strong.

Learn More
Mural Walking Tour

Seaside has a flourishing art scene with quaint galleries and a monthly art walk in the historic Gilbert District, but it also has...

Learn More
COVID: What to Expect at Hotels and Vacation Rentals

Great news for those craving the revitalizing sea air and the sounds of the crashing surf from your balcony: Seaside’s hotels an...

Learn More
Roaming the Sand for Treasures

The beach is often filled with unique finds, especially after a storm.

Learn More
Read These Oregon Coast Page-Turners

A good book and the beach — there may be no better combination. Opened in 2005, Beach Books is a local institution where you ca...

Learn More
Chasing Waterfalls

Waterfalls around Seaside, Oregon.

Learn More
Insider Tips: Exploring the Prom Like a Local

It’s difficult to imagine Seaside without the historic Promenade, the famous lamp-lined trail that stretches along the sandy bea...

Learn More
Episode Three: the Seaside Aquarium

Take the audio walking tour of Seaside

Learn More
Boogie Nights

A look at Seaside's old dance hall and skating rink

Learn More
Salt Making in Seaside

A little history about the Salt Works; on December 28, 1805 the Lewis and Clark sent five men to establish a salt camp. Five days later, they found an ideal place on the seacoast fifteen miles southwest of Fort Clatsop (the seawater had a high salt content here, and game and wood were abundant).

Learn More