Seaside History

Beauty and the Beach (and a Photo Bomb)

June 5, 2013 | by Nate Burke

What time is it in this photo from the summer of 1949? According to the sundial, it’s right around 2:30pm. Located just south of Broadway on the promenade, the sundial still awaits the adventurous who eschew watches and cell phone time keeping. The sun is the original timepiece and during high summer, Seaside gets plenty of radiant opportunities to bask in shining rays and try out the old sundial. There is little information regarding the women pictured here, but beach-goers in the late 1940s were a daring bunch that found themselves at a cross section between pre-war fashion norms and new beachwear styles. The late 1940s ushered in a new era of swimwear fashion that introduced cutting edge two-piece swimsuits, as pictured here. Full acceptance of more liberal fashion trends has been an ongoing process that continues to evolve well into our own era.

Another thing that continues to evolve is the ever-popular photo bomb. Notice the two wee youngsters loitering in the background. Considering the somewhat snide body language captured here, they are clearly caught in a rascally moment. The current internet phenomenon of photo bombing occurs whenever someone in the background of a picture hijacks the original focus. These two boys are clearly well versed in scene-stealing and represent some of the earliest historical efforts to hijack a photo.

Editor’s note: The sundial is a bit faded compared to the vibrancy it featured around 1949. Look for it just outside the Worldmark by Wyndham resort swimming pool as you stroll the promenade.

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